Kīwaha

Kiwaha are colloquialisms used in everyday speech
  • Kei roto i a ia

    Concealed

    Wanikau 1890: 2

    This kīwaha was used traditionally as a way of describing a patu being concealed on the body, unknown to others. In a contemporary example, if someone was hiding their phone before they went to bed, either in their pocket or in their jersey, you could use ‘kei roto i a koe?’ to ask if it is concealed on their body. This could also be applied to money or a passport when travelling overseas.

  • He kanohi kainukere

    A keen eye

    Beattie 1920: 249

    This kīwaha refers to someone who has an eye for detail, or someone who has meticulous observation. It can be used as a compliment to someone who checks that the i’s are dotted and the t’s are crossed or has a sharp eye for detail. This could extend to skills in editing, design, research or decorating.

    Nukere is a southern word for a seal rookery and is a transliteration. Apparently the old time sealing gangs would sometimes head into these sheltered bays while it was still dark. In those times they were working in pitch black and the above kīwaha refers to someone who could still make out the seals in a darkened rookery. Further to that it was a proverb applied specifically to Topi Patuki acknowledging his skill in precision in the art of warfare.

  • Aoraki Matatū

    Be proud, stand tall like Aoraki

    O’Regan 2014: 110

    This kīwaha/pepeha was composed by Kā Pari Kārakaraka 2008 with the guidance of Tā Tīmoti Kāretu.

    This can be used as a way to introduce yourself so people know what tribal affiliations you have, or it can be used as a way to encourage others to be proud in all things Kāi Tahu.

  • Kia manawa tītī

    Be courageous like the tītī

    O’Regan 2014: 110

    This pepeha was composed by Kā Pari Kārakaraka 2009 with the guidance of Tā Tīmoti Kāretu. The kīwaha/pepeha is comparing the heart of the tītī to the heart of the tribe including characteristics such as endurance, courage, determination and bravery.

    The kīwaha/pepeha ‘kia manawa tītī’ can be used as a way to encourage others to be courageous like the tītī, for example on the sports field, during exams or when they have an important kaupapa to get through. ‘He manawa tītī’ can also be used as a way to introduce yourself so people know your tribal affiliations.

  • Kāhore he riteka

    There is no option/choice

    Wanikau 1890: 2

    This kīwaha is best used as a way to say ‘there is no other option/choice’. If your child is crying because they want to wear the clothes they had on yesterday, stains and all, you could use ‘kāhore he riteka’ to tell them they must wear the clean clothes, there is no other option. This could also be applied to food. If you have cooked dinner for your family and they do not want to eat it, ‘kāhore he riteka’ would be a polite way of reminding them that they will go hungry if they do not eat the food they have been given.

  • Maniori!

    Be quiet! Noisy

    Shortland 1974: 309

    To be used when someone or a group of people are being noisy. It can be used as a replacement for ‘turituri’. It can be used when you are babysitting, in a classroom or at home.

    Example/Hai tauira: Tamariki mā, maniori! - Children, be quiet!

  • Kia kūrapa

    Be quick! Hurry!

    Patuki 1854: 185

    To be used as a way of asking someone to hurry up. You would use this in the same context as ‘kia tere’. It can be used when the kids are getting ready for school or perhaps when someone is late for work.

    Example/Hai tauira: Kia kūrapa mai koutou! - Hurry up everyone!

  • Hauata

    Don’t worry, it was an accident.

    Beattie 1920: 45

    If someone has done something and it is obviously an accident, then it would be correct to say “hauata” as a way of saying “oh well, never mind, it was an accident.”

    This is a particularly good kīwaha to use with tamariki. Often tamariki may argue about who is responsible for something trivial like spilt milk. To end the debate one can say ‘hauata’ never mind, it was an accident.

    Example/Hai tauira: Hauata, kaua e taki. - It was just an accident, don’t cry.

  • Nau mai, haere!

    Go!

    Wanikau 1890: 2

    This kīwaha is a saying for the instruction ‘go’.

    This kīwaha is recorded in the Te Wanikau manuscript. It is understood that it is a way of letting someone know you want them to go, leave or get out of your face. This could extend on to the sports field.

    Example/Hai tauira: Nau mai, haere! - Go! Get out of here.

  • E aha te kata?

    What are you laughing at?

    Beattie 1920: 255

    This is a response to someone’s negative behaviour or if someone is making fun of something or laughing for no reason. It is a rhetorical question and does not need a response.

    If someone is laughing at you and you are annoyed by it, you could say “e aha te kata”.

    This is also an example of a prominent feature of the Kāi Tahu dialect where the dropping of the ‘h’ is consistent within our manuscripts. The following kīwaha also has this feature present.

  • E aha tāhau?

    What’s up with you?

    Beattie 1920: 255

    This is a response to someone’s negative behavior or words.

    This kīwaha can be used in a few different ways.

    If someone is in a grumpy mood or is giving you attitude then this kīwaha is a good way of re¬sponding. It can be a rhetorical question, or a question that demands an answer depending on the severity of the situation.

    If someone is genuinely upset, your tone would change and you could ask this question to find out what is wrong.